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EVENT DATES
Apr 2018
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Venue

NGA Campus East 7500 GEOINT Drive Springfield , Virginia 22150
Tel: (571) 557-5400
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AFCEA Spring Intelligence Symposium 2018 - Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association

Attendees

-

Exhibitors

18

Register

$80 - $520

Overview

Event Overview:

The Spring Symposium will provide the opportunity for Government, industry and academia to discuss the implications of the NSS and the challenges and new opportunities it presents for intelligence practitioners.  The threat spectrum is large and fueled by technologies that provide capabilities to a broad variety of actors intent on doing damage to U.S. interests.  Countering these threats will take the combined might of the U.S. Government, academia and industry.  The Spring Symposium offers the forum for dialogue on how we can organize our efforts to succeed together.

About AFCEA International:

AFCEA International, established in 1946, is a non-profit organization serving its members by providing a forum for the ethical exchange of information, and dedicated to increasing knowledge through the exploration of issues relevant to its members in information technology, communications and electronics for the defense, homeland security and intelligence communities.

Exhibitor Prospectus and Kit

Agenda

Apr 18   

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST


8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
AFCEA WELCOME & SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW

Mr. Ray Cross
Vice President for Intelligence
AFCEA International

VADM Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret.)
Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee


8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
THE 2018 CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED INTELLIGENCE SERVICE

VADM Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret.)
Chair
AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Ms. Maureen Baginski
Charlie Allen Award Recipient


9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
KEYNOTE ONE: THE IC AND THE NEW NATIONAL SECURITY STRATEGY
Ms. Sue Gordon is the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence.  One of her key responsibilities is to map the future for the Intelligence Community (IC).  She will share her views on technology and operations and the need for an Intelligence Community to improve to meet changing threats, improve digital capabilities, deal with data abundance and evolve within fiscal realities.  She will discuss the need to build upon DoD and private sector investments to enable to IC to “go fast” and make tailored investments unique to foundational IC missions.

Introduction
Ms. Terry Roberts
CEO and Founder 
Whitehawk, Inc.

Speaker
Hon. Sue Gordon
Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence
Office of the Director of National Intelligence


10:15 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS


11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

SESSION ONE: THE THREAT ENVIRONMENT 

Moderator
Mr. Charlie Allen
Principal
The Chertoff Group

Panelists
Mr. Randell Blake
National Intelligence Officer (NIO) for Transnational Threats

Mr. Chris Bort 

NIO for Russia

Mr. John Culver 

NIO for East Asia

 

Mr. Neil Wiley
Director of Analysis
Denfense Intelligence Agency

 


12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
LUNCH & EXHIBITS 


1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
SESSION TWO: INFORMATION AND DATA MODERNIZATION
The NSS states that “The ability to harness the power of data is fundamental...data, like energy, will shape US economic prosperity and our future strategic position in the world.” The world is evolving at a scale unprecedented in human history, bringing with it a proliferation of publicly available information (PAI) that the IC does not task nor control, but must learn to harness. The IC no longer has primacy on critical intelligence such as SIGINT, IMINT, and HUMINT and, in fact, new classes of intelligence are now available through and only because of the open source domain. The IC has been challenged with this pace of change, but must view this data revolution as an opportunity, not just as a vulnerability. Given the IC will not be able to grow its analytic workforce in line with the explosion of data we face, we must consider the IC workforce of the future, the role of ICITE to bring together and share community data, and the application of emerging technologies—including artificial intelligence and its sub-disciplines of machine learning and deep learning— the IC needs to embrace to make sense of both classified and PAI data in its volume, velocity, and variety. This panel will tackle the hard questions of harnessing and actioning big data across the IC, using all sources, genres, and modalities to provide context, and improve our ability to find answers and solve problems--not just inform decision makers.

Moderator
Dr. Lisa Costa
Vice President, Intelligence and Chief Scientist
PlanetRisk

Focus Questions:

What are the most promising data sources and technologies that the IC must access and harness to solve the very hard intelligence problems and provide strategic, operational and tactical advantage?

What are the opportunities and limitations on our current and projected data infrastructure to realize the opportunities presented by the information revolution?

Has the IC made necessary investments in artificial intelligence and machine learning to automate routine functions and find meaning in the big data stream?  Where has the IC found success?  Where is it struggling?

What partnerships, policies and technological advances are required for the IC to more effectively mix and cross-cue open sources and classified data to meet mission objectives?


3:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. 
STRETCH BREAK


3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

SESSION THREE: THE REVOLUTION IN SPACE
Convergence of major components of the digital age has fundamentally increased the technical maturity and sophistication of potential adversary military and intelligence services that carry great implications for national security.  Global networks have shifted to agile, mobile applications and technologies and cyber is transitioning from “cable bound” to RF space.  In combination, developments have eroded ability to protect intelligence capabilities and project national power surreptitiously and decisively.  This panel will explore forces such as hyper-proliferation of sensors, the global “Internet of Things,” “Dark Web” technologies, and other advances that combine to create dangerous and vexing challenges.  It will discuss potential strategies to converge Big Data, Big Sensor and Big Cyber capabilities into a connected environment that extends from the ocean floor to space.  The panel will discuss the imperative for rapid and decisive IC action to achieve asymmetric advantage in this dangerous and evolving environment and the need for revolutionary space-based intelligence capabilities.

Moderator
Dr. Dave Honey 
Senior Technical Advisor
Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Panelists
Mr. Byron Hargis
Government Sales Manager
SpaceX

Focus Questions:

What is the IC strategy for leveraging the emergence of Phase 4 Internet capabilities and what is required to achieve asymmetric advantage?

What vulnerabilities does the convergence of these technologies and applications present for US and allied national security?

What is changes are needed within the IC, to include cyber operations, to deal with the accelerating changes in global communications?

What are the implications for cryptography, cryptology and personal privacy?


4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
SYMPOSIUM RECEPTION

Apr 19   

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST


8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
DAY TWO WELCOME & ADMINISTRATIVE ANNOUNCEMENTS

Mr. Ray Cross
Vice President for Intelligence
AFCEA International

LTG Bob Noonan, USA (Ret.)
Vice Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee


8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
KEYNOTE TWO: ACTING ON THE NEW NATIONAL DEFENSE STRATEGY 

Introduction
LTG Bob Noonan, USA (Ret.)
Vice Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Speaker
Hon. Joe Kernan, Vice Adminral, USN (Ret.)
Under Secretary for Defense Intelligence


9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS


10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
SESSION FOUR: IC TECHNICAL & TECHNOLOGY MODERNIZATION 
The NSS says the “United States will prioritize emerging technologies critical to economic growth and security.” It goes on to specify needs to understand S&T trends, improve collaboration with industry and academia, use private sector technical expertise and R&D capabilities and rapidly field innovations.  Against this backdrop, we will discuss needs within the IC that span technical collection, analyses, and threat, as well as the need to solve hard problems from emerging science and technology and the lowering of barriers to complex tools and arsenals in cyber, biology, nuclear physics, materials science, and chemistry.  Once reserved for only nation states, emerging science and technology (S&T) capabilities will have a profound impact on national security with few apparent opportunities for deterrence. Genomic editing (e.g., CRISPR), additive manufacturing with composite materials, quantum computing and encryption, electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attacks, and miniaturization of highly scalable sensors hidden in multiple form factors, all have the potential for coming into the hands of individuals. At the same time, new delivery mechanisms (e.g., weaponized unmanned vehicles of all types) are growing in popularity with increased capability and decreased cost. Attacks that were not possible ten years ago are now a reality. Much of the expertise for weaponizing  these emerging technologies resides not in government but in the private sector,  with small-form-factor weapons of mass destruction soon plausibly harnessed not only by laboratories, but by individuals and small groups. This panel will explore emerging new S&T threats and address how the IC should respond.

Moderator
Mr. Lewis Shepherd
Deloitte Consulting and OSD/Strategic Capabilities Office

Focus Questions:

What skills sets and knowledge does the government need from industry and academia to better understand the impact of these new technologies on the threat environment? How does the clearance process help and hinder this objective?

Because technology is changing at such a fast speed, what has the IC done or what are its plans to embrace technology-driven capability in acquisition, vice only validated-requirements-driven capability? 

With the emergence of new commercial capabilities, once reserved for nation-state actors, how will the IC obtain the required expertise and indications and warning (I&W) for both vertical and horizontal proliferation of knowledge and skills in emerging new S&T?

How will new PAI sensors enable and challenge the IC in detecting intent and capability of nation-state and non-state bad actors? What are the implications for operational security?

What can the US do to better secure critical infrastructure against emerging new capabilities that foil traditional security measures?


11:15 a.m.  - 12:30 p.m.
LUNCH & EXHIBITS 


12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
KEYNOTE THREE: STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES AND THE IC

Introduction & Moderator
Mr. Lewis Shepherd
Deloitte Consulting and OSD/Strategic Capabilities Office

Speaker
Dr. Will Roper
Director
Strategic Capabilities Office


1:45 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
STRETCH BREAK


2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

THE IC -- USG & PRIVATE SECTOR -- WORKFORCE OF THE FUTURE
The NSS lays out the requirement for intelligence to “understand and anticipate foreign doctrine and the intent of foreign leaders, prevent tactical and operational surprise and ensure that U.S. capabilities are not compromised before they are fielded.”  These broad expectations place simultaneous requirements for deep expertise and rapid adoption of technologies in a climate of rapid change.  To be successful, the workforce must provide deep expertise produced by continuity and adaption required by constant modernization.  This panel will explore these competing priorities and how they will be addressed, the role that industry will play in a combined IC approach and how talent can be recruited and retained to provide the capabilities the NSS requires.

Moderator
VADM Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret.)
Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee
Former Director, Defense Intelligence Agency
 

Panelists
Ms. Melissa Drisko
Deputy Director
Defense Intelligence Agency

Ms. Carrie Wibben
Director, Counterintelligence & Security
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Intelligence)

 

 Focus Questions:

What skills and skill mixes will be required in the future workforce?  What changes to skills resident in today’s workforce will be required?  What skills and capabilities will be required of the private sector to accomplish future intelligence missions?

What is the status of recruiting and retention?  Is the IC capable of recruiting for today’s and future needs?  Is it retaining the skill base needed for future success?

The benefits of changing Government personnel approaches to facilitate movement between industry and Government are often discussed.  Where is the IC in its thinking on this subject and how do options for movement between the private sector and Government figure into future workforce planning?

What is the status of clearance reform?  How will future clearance processes facilitate recruiting and retaining a cleared workforce with requisite skills for future needs within Government and the private sector?


3:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP

Keynote Speakers

Ms. Sue Gordon

Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence

THE IC AND THE NEW NATIONAL SECURITY STRATEGY

Ms. Sue Gordon is the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence.  One of her key responsibilities is to map the future for the Intelligence Community (IC).  She will share her views on technology and operations and the need for an Intelligence Community to improve to meet changing threats, improve digital capabilities, deal with data abundance and evolve within fiscal realities.  She will discuss the need to build upon DoD and private sector investments to enable to IC to “go fast” and make tailored investments unique to foundational IC missions.

Hon. Joe Kernan

Vice Adminral, USN (Ret.)

Under Secretary for Defense Intelligence

Acting On The New National Defense Strategy 

Dr. Will Roper

Director, Strategic Capabilities Office

Strategic Capabilities And The Ic

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