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EVENT DATE
Oct 2017
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Venue

Hilton San Diego Bayfront 1 Park Boulevard San Diego , California 92101
Tel: (619) 564-3333
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AIPM 28th Annual Clinical Meeting - Academy of Integrative Pain Management

Overview

Event Overview:

For almost three decades, our annual meeting has been the only clinical meeting dedicated to integrative pain management. At our meetings, you can:

Learn how to safely and effectively manage peoples’ pain through the latest integrative, multidisciplinary, and multimodal approaches to care.
Advance to the next level in pain management via the intensive 2-day Comprehensive Review Course to prepare for the Advanced Credentialed Pain Practitioner exam, or simply to refresh your knowledge on best practices in pain care.
Expand your horizons with visionary keynotes from national health policy leaders and integrative pain management champions.
Excel personally and professionally as part of largest multidisciplinary organization of pain professionals in the US and the only one rooted in an integrative approach to pain care.
Relax and focus on enhancing your professional life in a beautiful, serene resort environment.

Exhibitor Information:

Don’t miss the only national conference to address integrative pain management approaches to patient care.

Showcase your pain management products, programs, and services

1,000 conference registrants expected

Multidisciplinary pain management providers

Decision makers, buyers, & influencers

Exhibit hall hub of activities

Unapposed exhibit hour schedule

Scenic & relaxing venue

About AIPM:

The Academy of Integrative Pain Management (AIPM) is a non-profit organization that educates clinicians about pain and its management through an integrative interdisciplinary approach. The organization has approximately 4,300 members who represent a variety of disciplines, including medicine, nursing, psychology, and physical therapy. The Annual Clinical Meeting is the Academy’s primary educational offering. The Academy is accredited by the ACCME and the APA, and seeks accreditation for several other disciplines. In addition to the more than 50 clinical presentations, the meeting includes poster sessions, networking opportunities, and exhibits. The meeting draws approximately 1,000 attendees.

Notes:
Sponsorship Details:

Agenda

Oct 19   

9:00 AM-4:30 PM

Autonomic Self-Regulation for Chronic Centrally Sensitized Pain 
Emerging evidence for how ASR and heart rate variability (HRVB) can result in pain reduction – and a feeling of empowerment for patients.

This six-hour demonstration, hands-on, and instructional course will foster understanding of how autonomic self-regulation (ASR) empowers patients to manage centrally sensitized chronic pain. This course will explain how heart rate variability (HRV) brings about “left foot braking at the sino-atrial node,” and attendees will learn about the empirically measurable benefit, which this integrative clinical intervention has for pain reduction. ASR will be considered from both a research and a clinical perspective. The autonomic and central nervous system pathways that are shared by centrally sensitized chronic pain and autonomic nervous system (ANS) self-regulation will be presented and elucidated. Emerging data from our ongoing VA-funded research on ASR and chronic pain in veterans and other studies, including cancer survivors, along with clinical insights and experiences, will be shared. Many chronic pain conditions are associated with central sensitization, including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, osteoarthritis, musculoskeletal and dental pain, headaches, and visceral and postsurgical pain. Fibromyalgia will be explored in greater depth as an example of a centrally sensitized pain condition that is responsive to ASR.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to 1) Define and describe the meaning of integrative medical management, chronic sensitized pain, and autonomic self-regulation (ASR); 2) Describe the basic science of heart rate variability (HRV) and its relationship to ASR; 3) Summarize the nervous system pathways shared by chronic sensitized pain and ASR; 4) Describe case studies of the application of ASR to chronic sensitized pain; 5) Identify HRV parameters that are biomarkers of emotional health; 6) Identify HRV parameters that are biomarkers of emotional and physical health; 7) Discuss how ASR can be used for health assessment and behavioral change; 8) Explain ASR techniques and tools; 9) Discuss how to incorporate ASR into a therapeutic practice model for chronic pain patients.
Faculty: Raouf S. Gharbo, DO; Jay P. Ginsberg, PhD; Melanie E. Berry, MS, BCB, Aubrey Berry, BS, ABT CP-TLP, CES, CHP OMC, FAIS 
This is a Pre-Meeting Workshop; additional fees apply.

 

9:00 AM-4:30 PM

Certificate in Nutritional Pain Management Workshop (CNPM)
The only program of its kind! Prove your knowledge about how food, diet and supplements can help manage pain.
This six-hour workshop is a practical clinical program covering the importance of food as a pain management intervention. This program, chaired by Robert Bonakdar, MD, FACN, and Nancy, Cotter, MD, FACN, CNS, will include a discussion of where to start the conversation with patients about using diet and supplements to treat pain. It will also include the five components necessary in a diet for those in pain. Evidence and case studies will show participants how to incorporate this vital intervention into their practices. 
Interventions include:
• Initiating a specialized diet in specific pain conditions
• Antiinflammatory diet
• Elimination diet: when and how: FODMAPs, specific carbohydrate diet, etc.
• Role of herbal supplements (curcumin, boswellia, ginger, etc.) in pain management
• Role of non-herbal dietary supplements (omega-3s, CoQ10, B-vitamins, probiotics, etc.) in pain management
The faculty will discuss nutrition and supplements for common conditions, including:
• Fibromyalgia
• Migraine/headache
• Osteoarthritis
• Chronic low back and musculoskeletal pain
• Obesity

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Describe the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis and how it may be impacted by diet; 2) Illustrate dietary patterns that modulate inflammation; 3) List the mechanisms by which nutrients and compounds affect pain; 4) Discuss ways in which inflammation related to pain states may be assessed; 5) Discuss the prevalence and rationale for the use of common integrative therapies in pain management; 6) Review the evidence for the most common integrative therapies utilized for pain; 7)Discuss approaches for coordination of integrative therapies in the management of pain.
Faculty: Robert Bonakdar, MD, FACN, and Nancy, Cotter, MD, FACN, CNS
This is a Pre-Meeting Workshop; additional fees apply.

 

9:00 AM-4:30 PM.

What’s Appropriate and What’s Not? Safe Opioid Prescribing in a World of Ever-Changing Regulations
The ins- and outs of prescribing opioids safely -- and legally.
This 6-hour, program is intended to provide education on the optimal management of chronic pain, particularly using opioids appropriately and managing patients’ risk for harm. Our distinguished faculty, led by pain expert Paul Christo, MD, will discuss the elements of appropriate opioid prescribing for chronic pain and engage the program attendees in interactive discussions of two illustrative case studies.  W. Clay Jackson, MD, will provide the primary care perspective on proper assessment for pain; strategies for assessing a patient’s risk for opioid misuse, abuse, and addiction; initial considerations in selecting an opioid, and alternative treatment options. Howard Heit, MD, will discuss safe prescribing;  use of the “Universal Precautions in Pain Medicine;” strategies to wean patients from opioids; and how to manage an inherited patient with substance abuse issues; and  Dr. Christo will discuss the various opioids, including abuse-deterrent formulations, the use of naloxone, suboxone, opioid interactions, and opioids in patients with complex issues such as addiction. Jen Bolen, JD, will provide the legal and regulatory perspective on opioid prescribing and will discuss how clinicians can best protect themselves and their practices from regulatory action and litigation.   

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to 1) Summarize the incidence of opioid overdose and the high percentage of unintentional overdose; 2) Describe the risk factors for prescription opioid overdose; 3) Identify assessment criteria for chronic pain and appropriate strategies for patient monitoring; 4) Explain the role of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations, naloxone use, and suboxone; 5) Describe the risks of opioid-drug interactions and identify groups at increased risk of harm from opioid use; 6) List three elements that must be included in the patient record of the chronic pain patient.
Faculty: Paul Christo, MD, Howard Heit, MD, FACP, FASAM, W. Clay Jackson, MD, DipTh, Bob Twillman, PhD, and Jen Bolen, JD
This is a Pre-Meeting Workshop; additional fees apply.

 

5:15-6:15 PM -- FULL CONFERENCE KICK-OFF!

Keynote: Presence, Patience, and Perseverance: A Veteran’s Story
Col. Gadson will tell his story of recovery from an improvised explosive device (IED) attack in Iraq that cost him both legs above the knees and normal use of his right arm and hand. As a career military officer and a college football player for West Point, he is a hard-wired team player, all of which give him an appreciation for team-based, integrative pain care.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the concept of resilience; 2) Describe the benefits of mindfulness; 3) Discuss the importance of team-based care.
Faculty: US Army COL (Ret) Greg Gadson 

 

Oct 20   

7:00-8:00 AM

Morning Exercise
This morning exercise session will work to stabilize neutral posture and restore physiological motion from head to toe. Be sure to wear comfortable clothing.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Utilize the integrated spinal stabilization pattern in breath; 2) Address neutral posture and dysfunctional compensation patterns; 3) Employ a sufficient warm up and cool down to optimize cardiovascular benefits of exercise; 4) Mobilize postural keystones with sequential muscle activation.   
Faculty: Roger Mignosa, DO

 

9:00-10:00 AM

Conference Assembly: Interdisciplinary Functional Restoration Programs for Chronic Pain
This program will focus on evidence-based content that supports the efficaciousness of a successful private clinic functional restoration program in an effort to promote best practices for managing chronic pain conditions, and to open discussion toward more unifying approaches among such programs. The presentation will provide examples and case studies of how key common chronic pain problems are well-served via a functional restoration program in comparison to traditional approaches. Presenters will also discuss the impact that treatment philosophy, outcome studies, and accreditation practices all have on measured and subjective outcomes. Lastly, the role of chronic pain education and movement-based exposure therapies to reduce fear of movement and improve ADL independence in a chronic pain population as well as the biopsychosocial considerations of functional restoration treatment will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Identify five different diagnoses that can be appropriately treated in an interdisciplinary functional restoration program; 2) Discuss three key characteristics of a successful functional restoration program; 3) Administer and discuss the value of the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) as a tool for guiding treatment; 4) Illustrate the usefulness of emphasizing decreased pain interference as a more salient goal than decreased pain intensity.  
Faulty: Mark Johnson, PhD, Peter Abaci, MD, Michael Sullivan, PT

 

10:50-11:20 AM

Fibromyalgia: Best Practices for Integrative Treatment Approaches
This session will give a brief overview of the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Identify challenges of diagnosing fibromyalgia; 2) Discuss practical approaches to the work up; 3) Outline a strategy for managing fibromyalgia.
Faculty: Lynette Cederquist, MD

 

Mind Body Therapies for Pain and PTSD in the Military Setting
How mind-body medicine has become an integral component of healthcare in the military, especially at the Naval Medical Center San Diego Mind Body Medicine program.
CDR Jeffrey Millegan, MD, MPH, will provide an overview of the Naval Medical Center San Diego Mind Body Medicine program and discuss recent progress in the integration of mind body therapies into the treatment of pain and PTSD in the military setting.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Describe the core elements of the Naval Medical Center San Diego Mind Body Medicine program; 2) Discuss the role of mind body medicine as an integral component of health care delivery in the military; 3) Identify critical outcome metrics and stakeholders in successful integration of mind body medicine in the military setting; 4) Develop new strategies to advance mind body medicine within the military.
Faculty: Jeffrey Millegan, MD, MPH, FAPA, CDR MC USN

 

Update on Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
Course Description: This program will review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, current diagnostic criteria, and both the current and potential treatments of complex regional pain syndrome.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Identify the risks factors associated with developing CRPS; 2)Recognize the current diagnostic criteria; 3) Discuss available treatments and potential treatments.

Faculty: Paul Christo, MD

 

 

11:25 AM-11:55 AM

Case Study Session: Fibromyalgia          
This session will present a case study on fibromyalgia.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Propose the differential diagnosis for a patient who presents with diffuse pain and fatigue; 2) Outline the work up for the case presented; 3) Develop a management plan for the patient presented.
Faculty: Lynette Cederquist, MD

 

Connecting Foods with Symptoms: The Allergy Elimination Diet and Pain
Uncovering hidden food allergies and sensitivities through an elimination diet
The idea that foods can harm as well as heal is gaining traction in those who care for patients with chronic disease. Due to the exposure-dependent nature of food allergies and sensitivities, connecting foods with the symptoms they cause presents a challenge to clinicians and patients alike. In this lecture, we will examine the gold standard of uncovering hidden food allergies and sensitivities: the allergy elimination diet. We will examine the current body of literature, discuss a specific protocol, and use a case study to illustrate the concepts discussed.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the pathophysiology of food allergy, sensitivity, and food intolerance; 2) Describe the allergy elimination diet protocol; 3) Illustrate the concepts inherent in the allergy elimination diet with a case study.
Faculty: Nancy, Cotter, MD, FACN, CNS

 

Virtual Reality Is a Reality—and It’s Helping Chronic Patients Right Now
Decades of research have now made this technology a helpful tool in patient care.
An explanation of what Virtual Reality (VR) is and how it can help to decrease pain will be presented. The session will discuss study results using VR in pain management over the past two decades. Studies using VR for both acute and chronic pain, as well as for alleviation of comorbid anxiety, will be presented.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the clinical use of VR; 2) Discuss the objective of clinical studies performed with VR for pain management; 3) Review the uses of VR in the continuum of pain management; 4) Explain the future directions in the use of VR.
Faculty: Brenda K. Wiederhold, PhD, MBA, BCB, BCN

  

1:55-2:55 PM

Keynote: Reflections on Pain in the Brain                    
Using mirrors, we demonstrate, both in patients and in normal individuals, the extraordinary malleability of brain modules and their striking interactions with each other, with the skin and bones, and with other people. This program will discuss the clinical utility of these findings.  

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Explain the Golden Age of Neurology (late 18th-early 19th century: Broca, Charcot, Freud, Goldstein, Babinski, etc.); 2) Demonstrate clinical utility of mirror visual feedback in treating various chronic neurological conditions including phantom pain, neglect, hemiparesis, and RSD/CRPS; 3) Illustrate the dominant role played by vision in both health and disease; 4) Demonstrate that the value of a scientific discovery is often inversely related to the sophistication of data acquisition and analysis.     
Faculty: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran, PhD, MBBS          

 

3:00-3:30 PM

Migraine: It Doesn’t Have To Be a Headache
Migraine is the most common headache requiring medical treatment. It is estimated that there are 37 million migraine sufferers in the US. Migraine is responsible for half of all neurological disability. It is believed that only half of those with migraine are ever diagnosed—and even when they are, their care is often inadequate. However, there are times when migraine or other primary headches progress in the face of appropriate care. This presentation will prepare the provider to: recognize the clinical features of migraine, distinguish which headaches require  additional investigation, and identify the components of a successful migraine plan.       

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Explain primary headache epidemiology; 2) Demonstrate knowledge of the risk factors for migraine progression; 3) Demonstrate knowledge of appropriate imaging for headaches; 4) Demonstrate knowledge of migraine staging.   
Faculty: Duren Michael Ready, MD, FAHS, ADAAPM

 

Low Risk, High Success: Prolotherapy Regenerative Medicine for Osteoarthritis
The science behind regenerative injections
Osteoarthritis is a common condition, affecting over 30 million adults in the U.S. alone. Insufficient healing of ligament or tendon connective tissue surrounding a joint is believed by some medical researchers to be the most important factor in the later development of osteoarthritis. Prolotherapy is a nonsurgical regenerative injection treatment that stimulates healing of joint connective tissue and may also promote cartilage regeneration. It is low risk, with a high success rate. This lecture discusses the science and studies supporting the three prolotherapy formulas—traditional dextrose, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and biocellular (stem cell)—and how prolotherapy works to reduce or eliminate pain.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Explain the most common etiology of osteoarthritis; 2) Discuss what is prolotherapy, its history, and how it has evolved; 3) Discuss the different forms of prolotherapy regenerative medicine and how and why each works to treat joint osteoarthritis.
Faculty: Donna D. Alderman, DO

 

 

Orofacial Neuropathy: Appropriate Diagnosis and Treatment
The presentation will offer a brief review of orofacial neuropathies of the trigeminal and facial nerves and proposed neurological mechanisms. Diagnostic testing will be stressed along with the importance of early diagnosis, prevention of missed diagnoses, and avoidance of inappropriate treatment. The balance of the presentation will provide a review of medical management of orofacial neuropathy and introduce novel treatments including effective intraoral topical medications and delivery mechanisms. Topicalformulations will be offered along with specific directions for compounding pharmacies. Case studies will punctuate the presentation with a short discussion period.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Distinguish between orofacial neuropathy and other pain in the orofacial region; 2) Briefly describe possible mechanisms of central and peripheral trigeminal neuropathic pain; 3) Prescribe treatment for orofacial neuropathies.
Faculty: Joseph Matthews, DDS

 

4:20-4:50 PM

Case Study Session: Migraine
This presentation will apply the prinicples of recognizing the clinical features of migraine, distinguishing which headaches require additional investigation, and identifying the components of a successful migraine plan, to demonstrate how they are applied with real world patients. 

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Demonstrate recognition of primary and secondary headache disorders; 2) Demonstrate ability to develop an effective headache plan for primary headache disorders.    
Faculty: Duren Michael Ready, MD, FAHS, ADAAPM

 

 

Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain: Victories and Defeats
Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is among the most lingering and difficult of chemotherapy-associated adverse events. Etiologies are various, and the evidence base for treatment is sparse. We will explore the mechanisms and epidemiology of CIPN, survey the literature for current treatments, and look ahead to next steps in the development of treatments.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Name three chemotherapeutic agents or classes associated with CIPN; 2) Name the one current therapeutic agent that demonstrated efficacy for CIPN in an NCCI-sponsored randomized controlled trial; 3) Discuss the potential role of peripheral sensitization in CIPN and how new treatments may target this pathway.
Faculty: W. Clay Jackson, MD, DipTh

 

Hormone Therapy for Pain Management
Back by popular demandUsing hormones to treat the underlying microglial activation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration.
This course discusses the hormone therapies in pain management that consist of: 1) replenishment of deficiencies and 2) administration for analgesia, neuroprotection, and neurogenesis. The use of hormones, including neurohormones, is intended to treat the underlying microglial activation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration as opposed to symptomatic pain relief.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Replenish hormones that show serum deficiencies; 2) Understand and name the neurohormones produced within the central nervous system; 3) Obtain and prescribe neurohormones.
Faculty: Forest Tennant, MD, Dr. PH

 

4:55-5:25 PM

How to Reboot the Body to Release Stress
This interactive presentation will review how stress plays an important role in facilitating chronic pain. The psychological effects of stress will be discussed, and hands-on methods will be demonstrated to release tension from areas of the body that commonly hold stress.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Perform techniques to release stored stress in the body; 2) Describe physiological mechanism of stress.
Faculty: Chuck Renner, OTR, CHT

 

 

Virtual Reality—Technology and Advanced Medical Imaging in Medicine
This will be an exploration using the advanced imaging techniques of 3D software and virtual reality to get a better visualization of the patient to make informed decisions regarding the patients path to healing. The course will explore the use of technology from radiologist to end-user physician and patient and how to use this technology as a tool for communication for healing.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Illustrate use of virtual reality in medical imaging; 2) Discuss the importance of communication between radiologist, technologist, patient and doctor; 3) Use technology as a tool for communication in the patient’s diagnosis and treatment.
Faculty: Michael Kurisu, DO

 

Advanced Medication and Procedural Options for Headache
This course will define what chronic migraine is and discuss the options for relieving acute migraine and medication overuse headache.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Define chronic migraine; 2. Demonstrate understanding of pharmaceutical options for acute migraine relief; 3. Illustrate options for treating medication overuse headache.
Faculty:  Christy Jackson, MD

 

5:30-6:00 PM

Identifying and Managing the Red Flags of Opioid Misuse
Using a synergistic integrated team approach to combat the opioid epidemic
A major focus of this presentation centers on effective identification, intervention, and integrated treatment of prescription drug abuse, dependence, pseudo addiction, or addiction for chronic pain patients. We will cover multidisciplinary evidence-based interventions, including family system specialists to help resolve this epidemic. Participants will also learn what suffering means for the chronic pain patient and how to help them find relief. This presentation will focus on four important areas: A) physical/biological; B) psychological (thinking /feeling); C) social/cultural; and D) spiritual. Each area is impacted when a person is living with chronic pain and coexisting disorders on a daily basis.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Identify at least 25 red flags that indicate that clients are using their prescription medication problematically and discuss simple interventions to address those problems; 2) Identify and explain the three core components of an effective chronic pain management treatment plan and why it takes an integrated multidisciplinary team in order to obtain positive treatment outcomes; 3) Explain at least four unique needs and/or obstacles confronting patients and their families who are living with chronic pain conditions and other coexisting psychological disorders, including addiction, and may need to be on prescription medications; 4) Articulate the importance of using a synergistic integrated team approach including family systems specialists with this challenging population in order to improve treatment compliance and success to help resolve the chronic pain and opioid epidemics.
Faculty: Stephen F. Grinstead, LMFT, ACRPS

 

Insomnia and Pain: Nonpharmacological Solutions
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTi) is a nonpharmacologic evidence-based treatment approach for insomnia. The links between pain and sleep are bidirectional.  Inadequate sleep can reduce pain threshold, facilitate inflammation, and inhibit healing and restoration. The significant challenges facing sleep in a setting of chronic pain distinguish this group from those with typical chronic insomnia. Despite challenges, nonpharmacologic interventions for insomnia have an important role in insomnia comorbid with pain. This talk will discuss sleep challenges, CBTi, and potential adaptations relevant to a population suffering with pain.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the different types of insomnia; 2) Discuss research showing the bidirectional relationship between pain and sleep; 3) Discuss the tenets of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTi) and other nonprescription medication strategies.
Faculty: Mindy Cetel, MD

 

Integrative Options for Headache: Out of the Medicine Cabinet and into the Pantry 
Non-pharmacological approaches to treating headache such as nutrition; biofeedback; herbs and supplements.
Historically, integrative therapies have been utilized sporadically in the treatment of headache. More recently there has been renewed interest in their incorporation as a component of patient-centered headache care. Research has also demonstrated that the incorporation of certain therapies may provide both clinical and cost efficacy in the setting of headache. This presentation will discuss the background and pattern of use of various integrative treatments. Additionally, the presentation will review evidence-based guidelines and resources for incorporation of integrative therapies for optimizing headache care.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the prevalence and rationale for the use of integrative therapies; 2) Review the evidence for the most common integrative therapies utilized for headache; 3) Discuss approaches for coordination of integrative therapies in the management of headache disorders.
Faculty: Robert Bonakdar, MD, FACN

Oct 21   

7:00-8:00 AM           

Practical QiGong for Your Daily Life and Practice
How qi (“energy”) movements can release and relieve pain
QiGong, one of the most widely practiced and researched energy medicine traditions in the world, is scientifically documented to relieve pain and stress, reverse aging and paralysis, boost your immune system, your energy, sense of well-being, and more. Start your day in a fun energizing way, and experience for yourself the meditative breathing and stretching exercises of “miracle healing” QiGong. Learn practical Qi tools you can apply immediately to your daily life and practice; and discover for yourself how QiGong can empower you, your staff, your patients, and your loved ones toward greater freedom from pain. Be sure to wear comfortable clothing.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss three ways to activate your Qi; 2) Demonstrate proper meditative QiGong abdominal breathing and posture and discuss its importance; 3) Identify three principles and practices of QiGong “PMA,” positive mental attitude, and discuss their importance; 4) Demonstrate and discuss how to balance and harmonize you and your client’s Qi for release and relief of pain.
Faculty: Nadia Linda Hole, MD

 

9:00-10:00 AM

Keynote: The Science, Politics, and Medicine of Medical Cannabis for Chronic Pain
The clinical evidence – and challenges – for treating pain with medical cannabis.
The presentation will cover the science, politics, and medicine for the successful integration of medical cannabis into clinical practice for treating chronic pain. A summary of the evidence for using medical cannabis to treat chronic pain will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the controversy and regulatory issues surrounding medical cannabis; 2) Discuss opioid/cannabinoid interactions; 3) Discuss the abuse potential of the cannabinoids; 4) Review the basic mechanisms and pharmacology of the cannabinoids; 5) Review the clinical evidence for pain relief.
Faculty: Mark Wallace, MD

 

11:05-11:35 AM

Noninvasive Treatments for Low Back Pain and ACP Guidelines 
Current management practices for low back pain have largely failed to stem rising costs or improve clinical outcomes. Incremental solutions, such as eliminating fraud and conflicts of interest, prior authorization for services, care coordination, and electronic health records, have similarly not improved results. This presentation will explore the 2017 American College of Physicians (ACP) Clinical Practice Guidelines on noninvasive treatments for acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain and how the guidelines can be pragmatically incorporated into patient care. Practical solutions to implement such approaches will be illustrated as well as barriers to care.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Assess the current state of low back pain management in the United States; 2) Summarize the recommendations of the 2017 ACP clinical guidelines for noninvasive treatments for low back pain; 3) Explain how noninvasive and integrative options can be incorporated in a practical manner consistent with the ACP guidelines.
Faculty: Robb Russell, DC

 

The Three E’s of Patient Communication: Empathy, Education, and Engagement to Improve Outcomes
Improving clinical outcomes through clinician-patient communications
This course will discuss a variety of evidence-based ideas surrounding best practices for communicating with patients who have chronic pain. These ideas will include the physician as an intervention with the use of empathy in the patient encounter, patient education, and the role that understanding the cause of pain can have on improving outcomes, motivational interviewing, improving patient self-efficacy and empowerment to guide their own treatment.  The presentation will be a combination of didactic material presentation, case-based discussion, and small group exercises to generate audience engagement.  

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the role of empathy and compassion in the patient encounter with an emphasis on using these techniques regardless of what treatment strategy is being chosen or offered; 2) Describe the role patient education can play and how being able to communicate the pathophysiology of patient’s pain condition can decrease anxiety and improve outcomes; 3) Illustrate the role that motivational interviewing can play in the encounter around chronic pain and why the use of it can improve self-efficacy.
Faculty: Jill Schneiderhan, MD, ABIHM, and Russell Lemmon, DO

 

A Common Condition You Haven’t Heard Of: Small Fiber Polyneuropathy
This session will provide an update on a not-so-rare condition associated with chronic pain, small fiber polyneuropathy. In addition to describing the condition, methods of assessment and treatment will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Define small fiber polyneuropathy; 2) Describe methods to make the diagnosis of small fiber polyneuropathy; 3) Describe current treatment approaches for small fiber polyneuropathy.
Faculty: Charles E. Argoff, MD

 

11:40 AM-12:10 PM

Team-based Care for Low Back Pain: A Panel Discussion
Current management practices for low back pain, irrespective of the approach taken, have largely failed to control costs or improve clinical outcomes. In the U.S., the prevalence and costs of back pain treatment are high and increasing —but clinical outcomes are not improving. This panel session will explore how restructuring the delivery of spine care, including team-based care, is necessary. Changing spine care delivery can help improve patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes and reduce costs. The panel will review and discuss real-world case scenarios.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Address how fragmentation and misdirected care, inappropriate incentives, and inefficient communication lead to poor outcomes for low back pain; 2) Explain how team-based, relationship-centered care can refine the approach to low back pain to produce optimal patient outcomes; 3) Explain how integrative care options can be pragmatically incorporated in a care plan.
Faculty: Robb Russell, DC, Melissa Nagare, DC, LAc, Clifford Lee, LAc

 

The Moral Debate: Do What’s Right – Or What’s Allowed?
This interactive presentation will discuss the impact of moral distress upon pain management specialists/clinicians. Additionally, participants will identify strategies to mitigate their moral distress. Facilitated discussion with open forum pre-prepared discussion questions to elicit learner reply/answers. Case examples will be included in the presentation. Information obtained will be de-identified to ensure confidentiality.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Define moral distress; 2) Identify root causes of moral distress; 3) Discuss strategies to mitigate moral distress in one’s practice. 
Faculty: Phyllis Whitehead, PhD, APRN/CNS, ACHPN, RN-BC

 

Case Study Session: Small Fiber Polyneuropathy
A case study designed to highlight the diagnosis and treatment of small fiber polyneuropathy will be presented. Attendees will participate in the diagnosis and treatment options of this condition that is being recognized as a major cause of painful burning sensations in the feet.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Identify key symptoms of small fiber polyneuropathy; 2) Discuss key causes and conditions associated with small fiber polyneuropathy.
Faculty: Charles Argoff, MD

 

12:15-1:45 PM

Luncheon Keynote: How Healing Works: and What it Means for Health Care (Non-CME)
We now know that most of health—possibly up to 80%—comes from factors outside of what we usually do in the clinic or hospital. The primary determinants of health involve social, environmental, lifestyle, and complementary medicine factors that few clinicians learn to deliver. How can we integrate these health determinants into our routine practice?  In this course, Wayne Jonas, MD, will describe a simple, systematic approach called a HOPE (Healing Oriented Practices and Environments) visit that helps patients tap into their inherent healing capacity. Drawing on the most rigorous scientific evidence available, he will show that by adding some simple questions and tools to your office practice, you can quickly move toward more patient-centered, integrative health care and enhance your patients healing for any chronic disease. 

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Understand where health comes from and how medical care can access it; 2) Identify the three dimensions of integrative health used in chronic disease; 3) Learn about the HOPE note and how to apply it to enhance healing; 4) Name one activity that will expand your delivery of healing in practice.
Faculty: Wayne Jonas, MD

 

1:50-2:50 PM

Keynote: Wounded Healers: Preventing Clinician Suicide
Clinician suicide, tragic as it is, is not random or rare. Rather, it is the culmination of predictable risk factors, which differ in a key way from risk factors for suicide in the general population. We will examine these clinician-specific risk factors, explore ways to minimize risks, and discuss a shift in culture that leads to a healthier, more balanced model of caregiving.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Name the annual reported rate of physician suicide, and discuss its likely accuracy; 2) Name the risk factors specific to clinician suicide, and discuss how they differ from risk factors that accrue to the general population; 3) Discuss the concept of the “wounded healer” and how personal vulnerability may contribute to clinician effectiveness, but leave risk factors for reduced personal health.
Faculty: W. Clay Jackson, MD, DipTh

 

2:55-3:55 PM

Conference Assembly: Realities of Insurance Coverage for Integrative Pain Care
How a patient’s mindset affects outcomes, and the role of clinicians in managing expectations
Pain is a biopsychosocial condition that requires an integrative, comprehensive approach to treatment. It is essential that the toolbox of evidence-informed treatments provided by the full scope of licensed and certified health care providers are not limited by coverage constraints. In July 2017, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine released a report on Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic with a recommendation that public and private payers develop reimbursement models that support evidence-based and cost-effective comprehensive pain management encompassing both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment modalities. We will hear from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and a private payer about the process by which they make determinations for coverage. Through discussion and audience participation, we will look for future opportunities and different ways to think about the current evidence.    

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Demonstrate understanding of constraints and opportunities to improve coverage for the range of evidence-based integrative, comprehensive pain care; 2) Utilize available data and information about the effectiveness of integrative therapies for pain as a means of improving coverage for these therapies; 3) Demonstrate knowledge of the efforts both federally and on the state level to improve payer policies for pain, and how they can work with these partners to further this effort.
Faculty: R. Douglas Metz, DC, Denee Choice, MD, Bob Twillman, PhD, Mary Greene, MD, MPH, MBA

 

4:15-4:45 PM

Update on the Evaluation of Osteoarthritis
The program will start with evaluation techniques for Osteoarthritis (OA) including special imaging views.  Dr. Achar will discuss the cost of management, special physical exam techniques and focus on management including discussing role of exercise, the question of running and jumping with specific focus on the knee.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss why patients with OA should be counseled on exercise; 2) Explain the use of opioids in the management of OA.
Faculty: Suraj A. Achar, MD, FAAFP

 

Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) – An Integrative Approach
This session will expand upon the protocols of ERAS put forth by the University of California San Francisco with using the approach of Integrative Medicine modalities of acupuncture, massage therapy, and osteopathic manual treatments. The faculty will also review the evidence for ERAS as well as the additional uses of integrative modalities for decreasing time spent in hospital, improving pain control, and patient satisfaction.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Explain the ERAS protocol; 2) Demonstrate evidence for integrative medicine post surgical cases; 3) Discuss how ERAS protocols improve patient outcomes.
Faculty: Michael Kurisu, DO

 

The Evidence for Chronic Opioid Therapy for Chronic Pain
This session will provide an update on the current evidence for chronic opioid therapy for chronic pain.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Define chronic opioid therapy; 2) Describe current evidence for the use of chronic opioid therapy for chronic pain; 3) Describe current strategies to optimize treatment outcomes for chronic opioid therapy for chronic pain.
Faculty: Charles E. Argoff, MD

 

4:50-5:20 PM

Evidenced-based Approach to Osteoarthritis Management
The session will focus on the evidenced based approach to osteoarthritis management discussing, topical therapy, weight loss, exercise, bracing and whether opioids should be used at all.  We will also evaluate the evidence for intra-articular injections and medications to address pain catastrophizing.  Finally Dr. Achar will review the data for surgical procedures.  

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the role of topical therapy; 2) Review the data on intra-articular injection and surgery.
Faculty: Suraj A. Achar, MD, FAAFP

 

Frontline Clinical Use of Evidence-based Integrative Medicine for Chronic Pain
This presentation summarizes chronic pain treatment trends highlighting the increasing interest in incorporating integrative medicine approaches on the frontlines of clinical care. Examples drawn from federally funded research projects will illustrate opportunities and challenges of incoporating such approaches into everyday practice settings: patients’ and clinicians’ experience coordinating acupuncture and chiropractic care for chronic musculoskeletal pain with conventional health care services; a yoga-based adapted movement program embedded within an interdisciplinary primary-care based program for patients receiving long-term opioid  therapy; and a statewide Medicaid policy shifting reimbursable treatment for back pain designed to enhance access to integrative medical modalities for qualifying patients.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Describe changes in the availability of chronic pain-related treatment in the U.S. and its congruence with research data supporting such care; 2) Identify research-supported complementary health approaches for the treatment of chronic pain; 3) Provide examples of ways in which complementary health approaches have and can be integrated into integrated approaches to chronic pain treatment and evaluated. 
Faculty: Lynn DeBar, PhD, MPH

 

 

 

An Evidence-Based Need: Urine Drug Monitoring
This session will provide an update on the current evidence for urine drug monitoring for chronic pain.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Define urine drug monitoring; 2) Describe current evidence for the use of urine drug monitoring for chronic pain; 3) Describe current strategies to optimize urine drug monitoring for chronic pain.
Faculty: Charles E. Argoff, MD 

 

 

5:25-6:25 PM

Keynote: Changing Mindsets to Enhance Pain Treatment Effectiveness
How a patient’s mindset affects outcomes, and the role of clinicians in managing expectations.
Patient expectations shape the experience of pain, pain treatment needs, and powerfully influence treatment response. Acquiring a positive mindset is critical to extinguishing nocebo responses and optimizing outcomes. Evidence shows that structure and function of the brain is changed by reducing a negative mindset in chronic pain. However, barriers exist for current “gold-standard” psychological treatment. Brief, low-cost treatments that target mindset as a psychological saboteur of pain and outcomes may be scaled to efficiently and economically address a key aspect of the pain crisis in the U.S. This session will review the evidence, current studies, and future directions that hold promise for harnessing the mind-body connection for pain relief.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss how negative and positive expectations influence pain intensity; 2) Discuss how negative expectations influence opioid analgesia; 3) Define pain catastrophizing and discuss its impact on pain outcomes; 4) Discuss how brief, targeted interventions may help shift mindset and address the unmet needs of patients who cannot access psychological treatment for pain.
Faculty: Beth D. Darnall, PhD

Oct 22   

7:00-8:00 AM

Awakening Qi
Practical Qi movements to apply immediately to your practice – and your own daily life.
Relax your mind, revitalize your body, and renew your spirit with QiGong! QiGong is scientifically documented to relieve pain and stress; reverse aging and paralysis; boost your immune system, your energy, sense of well being, and more. Start your day in a fun, energizing way and experience for yourself the meditative breathing and stretching exercises of “miracle healing” QiGong. Learn practical Qi tools you can apply immediately to your daily life and practice, and discover for yourself how QiGong can empower you, your staff,  your patients, and your loved ones toward greater freedom from pain. Enjoy! Be sure to wear comfortable clothing.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss three ways to activate your Qi; 2) Demonstrate proper meditative QiGong abdominal breathing and posture and discuss its importance; 3) Identify three principles and practices of QiGong “PMA,” positive mental attitude, and discuss their importance; 4) Demonstrate and discuss how to balance and harmonize you and your client’s Qi for release and relief of pain. 
Faculty: Nadia Linda Hole MD

 

8:05-12:35 AM

The Nuts and Bolts for a Successful Integrative Pain Management Practice 
What is integrative pain management (IPM) and why should clinicians consider it to care for people in pain? Is this a viable business option for clinicians? In this four-hour workshop, the main principles of IPM and how it differs from the ways that pain is typically managed will be discussed, along with its role in team-based care. This workshop will illustrate some of the modalities that can be used in the IPM program and the evidence behind them. Presenters not only will identify appropriate integrative therapists/clinicians to deliver the care, but will provide criteria on how to select them, along with ways to customize the services and interventions to match the particular needs of the patient. Innovative business models that can significantly improve the integrative pain practice’s financial bottom line will be presented. Based on the ever-increasing new payment models whereby health systems are assuming financial risk for patient care, we will discuss how integrative pain management can get a seat at the financial able by offering great opportunities for outcome driven/cost saving strategies utilizing high touch/low tech integrative interventions. The six presentations below will be broken up by three, 30-minute panel discussions, each one addressing the content delivered in two sessions. The specific topics to be discussed and faculty are:
• Welcome and Overview, Lance Luria, MD, FACP, ABOIM 
• Integrative Modalities and the Evidence that Supports Them, Robert Bonakdar, MD, FACN 
• Selecting the Appropriate Arrow in Your Quiver—Matching the Modality to the Condition for Optimal Benefit, Jay Sandweiss, DO 
• Tools in the Toolbox: The Kinds and Varieties of Integrative Modalities Utilized, Kim Brower, MHA
• Good Is the Enemy of Great: Selecting the Right Therapists for the Best Outcomes, Chuck Renner, OTR, CHT 
• Getting a Seat at the Financial Table: Outcome Driven/Cost Saving Paradigms and the Role of the Physician as Manager, Lance Luria, MD, FACP, ABOIM 

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Describe how IPM differs from traditional pain management; 2) Discuss the benefits of IPM for both the clinician and the patient; 3) Define the benefits of creating an integrative pain management practice and the team members needed to provide this care; 4) Discuss the benefits of acupuncture for chronic pain; 5) Identify key supplements used to treat chronic pain; 6) Describe the benefits of an antiinflammatory diet; 7) Identify two therapies that work for low back pain; 8) Determine appropriate, evidence-based integrative medicine modalities; 9) Identify specific criteria and skills sets necessary for effective integrative medicine practitioners; 10) Discuss the basic qualifications for therapists treating chronic pain.
Faculty: Lance Luria, MD, FACP, ABOIM, Robert Bonakdar, MD, FACN, Jay Sandweiss, DO, C-NMM/OMM, DABMA, FAAMA, Chuck Renner, OTR, CHT, Kim Brower, MHA

 

 

8:05-9:05 AM

Traumatic Brain Injury—Restoring Neuroplasticity
This session will address the epidemic of brain injury and provide practical tools to assist physicians in identifying and treating trauma to the central nervous system.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Define the pathophysiology and epidemiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI); 2) Identify dysfunctional patterns that may be associated with an unidentified TBI; 3) Address various approaches to restore neuroplasticity in an injured brain; 4) Ignite conversation on the creation of comprehensive programs to restore function in TBI.
Faculty: Roger Mignosa, DO

 

Medical Acupuncture in Pain Medicine: Evidence and Practice
 Using a case based approach, this presentation will explore the current evidence for selected aspects of medical acupuncture and how they may be integrated into a busy pain practice to solve challenging clinical dilemmas.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss current evidence for selected domains in medical acupuncture; 2) Illustrate how evidence based medical acupuncture may be effectively integrated into an interdisciplinary pain practice to solve today’s challenging clinical presentations.
Faculty: Farshad Ahadian, MD        

 

9:10 - 10:10 AM

Is Systemic Lidocaine the New Standard of Care for Pain due to Inflammation?
Systemic lidocaine has been used successfully since the 1960s as an analgesic for central and peripheral neuropathic pain, migraine headaches, phantom limb pain or sensations, and for CRPS. We are now using it in abdominal surgeries (pre-emptively) in patients with sepsis or systemic infections from sepsis or IVDU, in cases of osteomyelitis, and in pancreatitis. Information will be presented to explain its systemic analgesic properties, but also its ability to serve effectively as an antiinflammatory agent. The latter effect likely contributes to its analgesic properties.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Converse knowledgably on lidocaine’s mechanism of action at the sodium channel; 2) Discuss the mechanisms of lidocaine’s antiinflammatory properties; 3) Explain by case example lidocaine’s effectiveness as a systemic analgesic and antiinflammatory agent; 4) Confirm the dosing strategies for systemic lidocaine as proposed by the speaker. 
Faculty: Don H. Bivins, MD

 

The Integrative Road Less Traveled: Autonomic Dysfunction and Headache
Key symptoms, clues and treatments for migraine and headache including vitamin supplementation, mindfulness, interventional treatments, and physical medicine
Practical review of autonomic circuits that relate to migraine and centralized pain, including symptoms related to sleep dysfunction, anxiety, tachycardia, temperature dysregulation, and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal dysfunction. The program will focus on key clinical symptoms that provide clues and insights toward better understanding of autonomic dysregulation.  Treatment modalities will be outlined including medication, vitamin supplementation, mindfulness, interventional treatments, and physical medicine to promote an effective, integrative toolbox for migraine and headache.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Demonstrate autonomic system effects on pain; 2) Discuss symptoms of autonomic dysfunction; 3) Illustrate treatment options for patients with autonomic dysfunction; 4) Discuss the overlap of gut and brain inflammation through the autonomic system.
Faculty: Wade Cooper, DO, FACN

 

10:30-11:30 AM

“Unlearning” Chronic Pain: Groundbreaking Concepts in Neuroscience, Medicine, and Psychology for Pain Elimination
Groundbreaking research of mind-body approaches to chronic pain
Chronic pain and associated disorders affect millions in the U.S. The bio-technological approach to these disorders has not been effective. Brain studies show that chronic pain is due to predictive coding, which is linked to stressful life events and emotions. This lecture will explain this model and discuss results from an NIH-funded trial for fibromyalgia. Dr. Schubiner will discuss how to explain this model to patients, gather the medical data required to rule out serious medical disorders, conduct detailed interviews, and make the diagnosis of a psycho-physiologic disorder. Finally, intervention techniques based upon the NIH study will be reviewed.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Describe how pain is processed in the brain and understand that chronic pain is often caused by learned neural pathways; 2) Recognize the relationship between pain and emotions and understand the psychological mechanisms that can create chronic pain; 3) Describe the results of a groundbreaking research study of a specific mind body approach to chronic pain; 4) Describe the four components in a mind body approach to guide clients in unlearning chronic pain.   
Faculty: Howard Schubiner, MD

 

 

Lessons from Chiropractic Medicine: Using Fewer High-Risk Drugs for Low Back Pain
Research behind non-pharmacological chiropractic care of low back pain and its associated with lower use of high risk drugs and reduced risk of ADEs. 
The overuse of opioids for treatment of low back pain in the U.S. is associated with increased risk of adverse drug events (ADEs). Among patients with low back pain, the speaker compared recipients and nonrecipients of chiropractic services with regard to likelihood of using high-risk drugs and the risk of ADEs. Nonpharmacological chiropractic care of low back pain is associated with lower use of high-risk drugs and reduced risk of ADEs. The research results will be presented, with discussion of the implications for clinical practice, health policy, and future research, and with time allowed for questions and answers.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the association between utilization of chiropractic services and use of high-risk drugs; 2) Discuss the association between utilization of chiropractic services and use of opioid analgesics; 3) Discuss the association between utilization of chiropractic services and risk of adverse drug events.  
Faculty: James M. Whedon, DC, MS

 

11:35 AM - 12:35 PM          

Retraining the Pain Brain—Sensory Biofeedback
The key to self-regulation is relaxation and being in present time. Then comes control of sensations through talking to the body, tensing and relaxing, loving it, circulating electrical energy, breathing through, expanding electromagnetic fields, collecting and releasing, balancing emotions with guided imagery, and finally, spiritual attunement.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Demonstrate autogenic training; 2) Discuss retraining with patients; 3) Demonstrate sensory biofeedback; 4) Illustrate spiritual principles of pain management.     
Faculty: C. Norman Shealy, MD, PhD

 

It's not in Your Head: Biological Rationales of Psychological Treatment for Chronic Pain
Psychological interventions for chronic pain to reduce patient resistance, enhance self-management, and improve patient-provider communication.
“They think it’s all in my head.” This is the natural assumption when given a well-meaning referral for pain psychology. This can result in resistance, conflict, distrust, and noncompliance. Biological rationales can facilitate clinical communication that can enhance motivation and reduce conflict. As scientific explanations of pain, pain management, and routine psychological skills have grown, so has our ability to provide a method for helping clients and their providers feel like they are working together on the same side. This presentation will provide a practical guide for using brief biological-based descriptions of pain and psychological tools for pain management.

Learning Objectives:
After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the biological rationales of common psychological interventions for chronic pain; 2) Discuss how using biological rationales can reduce resistance to utilizing psychological services for chronic pain; 3) Discuss which populations may be better served through the use of biological rationales; 4) Demonstrate how to implement the communication strategies in clinical practice. 
Faculty: Jill B. Fancher, PhD

Keynote Speakers

Mark Wallace, MD

Professor of Clinical Anesthesiology and Chair of the Division of Pain Medicine in the department of Anesthesiology at the University of California San Diego

The Science, Politics, and Medicine of Medical Cannabis for Chronic Pain

The clinical evidence – and challenges – for treating pain with medical cannabis.
The presentation will cover the science, politics, and medicine for the successful integration of medical cannabis into clinical practice for treating chronic pain. A summary of the evidence for using medical cannabis to treat chronic pain will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives: After completing this educational activity, participants will be better able to: 1) Discuss the controversy and regulatory issues surrounding medical cannabis; 2) Discuss opioid/cannabinoid interactions; 3) Discuss the abuse potential of the cannabinoids; 4) Review the basic mechanisms and pharmacology of the cannabinoids; 5) Review the clinical evidence for pain relief.

Mark Wallace, MD, is currently a professor of clinical anesthesiology and chair of the Division of Pain Medicine in the department of Anesthesiology at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine. He is the director of the division of clinical research in the UCSD Clinical and Translational Institute (CTRI) and sub-investigator for the NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Award for Excellence in Clinical Care, American Pain Society Center of Excellence Award, and the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award. Dr. Wallace has authored and co-authored more than 270 articles, abstracts, books, and book chapters concerning pain research and management. Dr. Wallace reports that he received honoraria from Semnur, Fleming Pharmaceuticals, Daiichi Sankyo, Zynerba, Boston Scientific, Vertex, Spinal Modulations, and Jazz Pharmaceuticals.

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