Menu
×
×

Sign Up

Your Profile will be reviewed by Admin
EVENT DATES
Oct 2018
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    
EXHIBITION HALL DATES
Oct 2018
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031    

Venue

Moscone Center 747 Howard Street 5th Floor San Francisco , California 94103
Tel: (415) 974-4000
Website
Google Map

ID Week 2018

Attendees

-

Exhibitors

108

Overview

Event Overview:

What is IDWeek?

IDWeek is the annual scientific meeting where infectious diseases professionals can meet, share experiences, and develop collaborations.

With the theme - Advancing Science, Improving Care - IDWeek features the latest science and bench-to-bedside approaches in prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and epidemiology of infectious diseases, including HIV, across the lifespan.

IDWeek is the combined annual meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA), and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS).

Attendee Information:

Who should attend IDWeek?

IDWeek is geared toward healthcare professionals in infectious diseases and healthcare epidemiology and prevention, including researchers, clinicians, quality and patient safety practitioners, epidemiologists, and public health officials, including those who see HIV and pediatric patients. It is a must-attend meeting for professionals who want to stay current, apply state-of-the art science to clinical care, and excel in their own careers.

What does IDWeek offer? What will I learn?

IDWeek offers healthcare professionals in infectious diseases and related disciplines unparalleled access to credible research and innovative practitioners. IDWeek features sessions that present advances in basic, translational, and clinical research in infectious diseases and healthcare epidemiology, including a focus on HIV and pediatric populations. The meeting provides state-of-the-art updates on key topics and issues.

Exhibitor Information:

The meeting will attract close to 7,000 healthcare professionals in infectious diseases and healthcare epidemiology and prevention, including researchers, clinicians, quality and patient safety practitioners, epidemiologists, and public health officials, including those who see HIV and pediatric patients. Space is limited and granted on a first-come, first-served basis.

About IDSA:

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) represents physicians, scientists and other health care professionals who specialize in infectious diseases. IDSA’s purpose is to improve the health of individuals, communities, and society by promoting excellence in patient care, education, research, public health, and prevention relating to infectious diseases.

About SHEA:

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) is a professional society representing physicians and other healthcare professionals around the world with expertise in healthcare epidemiology and infection prevention and control. SHEA’s mission is to prevent and control healthcare-associated infections and advance the field of healthcare epidemiology.

About HIVMA:

The HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) promotes quality in HIV care by advocating policies and supporting programs that ensure a comprehensive and humane response to the AIDS pandemic informed by science and social justice. HIVMA represents the diversity of medical subspecialties practicing HIV medicine - including internal medicine, family practice, infectious diseases, oncology, and obstetrics-gynecology.

About PIDS:

The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS) represents professionals dedicated to the treatment, control and eradication of infectious diseases affecting children. Membership includes physicians and doctoral-level scientists who are involved in clinical practice, research, teaching and/or administration. 

Agenda

Oct 3   

7 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Registration

8 a.m. – noon

Premeeting Workshops. Additional fees apply.

Official Meeting Begins

1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Session/Symposia

3:35 – 5:45 p.m.

Special Opening Plenary

6 – 7:30 p.m.

Opening Reception/Posters in the Park

Oct 4   

6:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Registration

7 – 8:15 a.m.

Meet-the-Professor Sessions

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Interactive Session/Symposia

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Exhibits

10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Posters

10:30 a.m. – noon

Interactive Session/Symposia

12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Poster Discussion Rounds

2 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Session/Symposia

3:45 – 5:45 p.m.

Named Lectures/Symposia

Oct 5   

6:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Registration

7 – 8:15 a.m.

Meet-the-Professor Sessions

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Interactive Session/Symposia

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Exhibits

10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Posters

10:30 a.m. – noon

Interactive Session/Symposia

12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Poster Discussion Rounds

2 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Session/Symposia

3:45 – 5:45 p.m.

SHEA Lectureship/Symposia

6 – 7:30 p.m.

IDWeek Society Event TBD

Oct 6   

6:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Registration

7 – 8:15 a.m.

Meet-the-Professor Sessions

8:30 – 10 a.m.

Interactive Session/Symposia

10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Exhibits

10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Posters

10:30 a.m. – noon

Interactive Session/Symposia

12:30 – 1:45 p.m.

Poster Discussion Rounds

2 – 3:30 p.m.

Interactive Session/Symposia

3:45 – 5:45 p.m.

Named Lectures

Oct 7   

7:30 – 10 a.m.

Registration

8 – 9:00 a.m.

Mini Symposia

9:15 – 10:45 a.m.

Closing Plenary Session

Keynote Speakers

Kathleen Rubins, PhD

Astronaut, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Houston, Texas

Kathleen Rubins was selected by NASA in 2009. Rubins completed her first spaceflight on Expedition 48/49, where she became the first person to sequence DNA in space. She spent 115 days in space and conducted two spacewalks. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Molecular Biology from the University of California and a Ph.D. in Cancer Biology from Stanford University Medical School Biochemistry Department and Microbiology and Immunology Department.

Dr. Rubins conducted her undergraduate research on HIV-1 integration in the Infectious Diseases Laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. She analyzed the mechanism of HIV integration, including several studies of HIV-1 Integrase inhibitors and genome-wide analyses of HIV integration patterns into host genomic DNA. She obtained her Ph.D. from Stanford University and, with the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rubins and colleagues developed the first model of smallpox infection. She also developed a complete map of the poxvirus transcriptome and studied virus-host interactions using both invitro and animal model systems.

Dr. Rubins then accepted a Fellow/Principal Investigator position at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research (MIT/Cambridge, Massachusetts) and headed a lab of 14 researchers studying viral diseases that primarily affect Central and West Africa. She traveled to the Democratic Republic of Congo to conduct research and supervise study sites. Work in the Rubins Lab focused on poxviruses and host-pathogen interaction as well as viral mechanisms for regulating host cell mRNA transcription, translation and decay. In addition, she conducted research on transcriptome and genome sequencing of filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) and Arenaviruses (Lassa Fever) and collaborative projects with the U.S. Army to develop therapies for Ebola and Lassa viruses. Dr. Rubins has published and presented her work in numerous papers at international scientific conferences and in scientific journals.

Spaceflight Experience:

Expeditions 48 and 49 (July 2016 through October 2016.) On July 7th, 2016, Dr. Rubins launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station aboard the first test flight of the new Soyuz MS spacecraft. Together the international crew of Expeditions 48 and 49 conducted or participated in more than 275 different scientific experiments including research in molecular and cellular biology, human physiology, fluid and combustion physics, Earth and space science and technology development. Dr. Rubins was the first person to sequence DNA in space, eventually sequencing over 2 billion base pairs of DNA during a series of experiments to analyze sequencing in microgravity. Dr. Rubins also grew heart cells (cardiomyocytes) in cell culture, and performed quantitative, real-time PCR and microbiome experiments in orbit. Dr. Rubins conducted two spacewalks totaling 12 hours, 46 minutes. During her first spacewalk, Rubins and Jeff Williams installed the first International Docking Adapter, a new docking port for U.S. commercial crew spacecraft. During the second, they performed maintenance of the station external thermal control system and installed high-definition cameras, enabling never-before seen images of the planet and space station. Jeff Williams and Rubins successfully captured SpaceX Dragon commercial resupply spacecraft and then returned science experiment samples to earth. During Expedition 49, Rubins and crewmate Takuya Onishi grappled Orbital ATK’s Cygnus resupply spacecraft, providing several tons of supplies and research experiments for future work on the orbital outpost. Rubins has logged 115 days in space and 12 hours and 46 minutes of spacewalk time.

Steffanie Strathdee, PhD

Associate Dean of Global Health Sciences and Harold Simon Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA

Dr. Strathdee is an infectious disease epidemiologist who is renowned for her research on the intersection of HIV and drug use, having generated more than 500 scholarly publications. She is Associate Dean of Global Health Sciences and Harold Simon Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Diego where she directs a campus-wide Global Health Institute. 

She is married to Thomas L. Patterson, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, where they co-direct a research and training program on the Mexico-US border.  Dr. Strathdee is credited with saving her husband’s life from a deadly superbug infection using bacteriophage therapy.  The case, which involved cooperation from three universities, the U.S. Navy and researchers across the globe, shows how phage therapy is a future weapon against multi-drug resistant bacterial infections which are expected to kill 10 million people per year by 2050.

SERVICE PROVIDERS

MORE events +

I Want to


CURRENTS is an excellent way to personally connect with 350+ attendees for optimum exposure. Take advantage of our exhibitor packages for maximum ROI.
Send me discounts and offers from hotels nearby
By Signing up you agree to User Agreement and Privacy Policy
I want to list my services